4 Job Interview Answers You Should Keep Short and Simple

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When to Keep Your Interview Answers Short

 

Many job searchers believe the longer their interview, the better their chances of getting the job. So they try to give lengthy answers to all questions in an effort to impress. But if you ask staffing firms and hiring managers, a little bit of brevity from time to time might actually improve your chances of getting hired. Some questions need lengthy answers, and just as many can be done in one or two sentences.

Here are a few common interview questions you’re better off responding to with short answers.

  1. How did you learn about the opening?

You can get this question out of the way in 30 seconds, tops. You could always answer you heard about the job on job boards, Craigslist or from a job fair. But a better answer would be to say you learned about the position from a colleague or employer, which led you to follow the company. It’s a short answer, but shows you took a real interest in the company, not just the job.

  1. What about your old job will you miss the most?

Go on for too long, and you risk showing you still haven’t gotten over your previous job. One way you could frame your answer is by expressing gratitude for the experiences you learned from your previous employer, but at the same time, wanting to grow in a new environment.

  1. Do you have any questions?

If you’ve done your homework about the role and the company, you’ll have only a few questions left to ask the hiring manager. While it’s important to come ready with your own questions, avoid asking long-winded ones. Otherwise, you might end up making mistakes that will cost you the job.

To avoid going on a tangent, it’s a good idea to refer to something concrete, perhaps something the interviewer said or something you read on their posting, and ask for clarification on that particular matter. Better yet, bring a list of questions with you to the interview!

  1. What kind of salary range are you expecting?

There’s no denying that salary questions tend to be awkward. To ease your discomfort over citing a salary figure that might be too high for the hiring manager’s liking, you try to justify your expectations with a long-winded answer about your skills and experience.

Good hiring managers already know your skills and experience — both are already in your resume. What they want to know is if your demands are in line with their budget. State a reasonable range based on your research and previous salary.

Learn more job search tips from the staffing consultants of Star Staffing. Contact us today to learn how our services can help you in your journey to find work.

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